5 Tips for Food Photography Success

We eat with our eyes. Appealing food photos are the difference between an average post and a viral post. These 5 tips will help you have success every time you take a picture. 

 

We eat with our eyes. Appealing food photos are the difference between an average post and a viral post. These 5 tips will help you have success every time you take a picture - click to read more on Knead to Dough

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  1. Choose your lighting.Unless you are lucky enough to have some swanky specialist lighting equipment at home, you are probably choosing between lamp/ceiling artificial light or natural window light. If you possibly can, go for the natural light, even if it means waiting until the next day to take your photographs. The brightness tends to be better, the colours improved, and you won’t struggle with beautifully composed but horribly yellow pictures when you upload them to your computer.5
  2. Choose your time of day.This relates to the previous point, really. I urge you to take your photographs during the morning/midday period to make the most of the natural light available to you. It really does make a world of difference to the quality and colours of your photos which equals a much yummier looking final result!
  3. Composition and Props.This one took me a while to get the hang of, as you can see – contrast my very first adventure photography a Hummingbird Loaf Cake (not my finest photography moment – but we all start somewhere!) with my more recent Terry’s Chocolate Orange Brownies or Vanilla Chai Orange Drizzle Tea Bread. Choosing the right angle, as well as what goes into the photo, makes all the difference.

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    For my brownies, layering up fabrics (use tea towels and baking paper contrasts!) added to wider shots, whilst for the tea bread it was getting a dramatic sideways, eye level angle with old-fashioned scales in the background. Pick up plates and dishes from boot fairs charity shops for a cheap ways to add interest.

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  4. Colour combinations.Most of my posts feature blue linens. This is not by chance. Firstly, blue is one of the key colours in my blog’s branding so it is important for me to continue the theme across my recipes. Secondly, according to the colour wheel blue compliments orange/brown tones which a lot of cakes/breads/cookies are, so it’s a win win! Choose colours to compliment the food you’ve made, or to contrast it, but avoid clashes unless they are offering a thought out style statement.1
  5. Portrait or Landscape.I like to take a mixture of portrait and landscape photos when I’m shooting a new recipe. The variety is nice when threaded through a blog post and they lend themselves to different things. It is really important to turn your camera portrait, though.It’s not always your first thought when we are so used to snapping pictures landscape, but Pinterest gives portrait pictures a LOT more room than landscape. That means a bigger picture which grabs more people’s attention than the small landscape image it’s next to. Maximise your Pinterest appeal, repins, and traffic by ALWAYS taking and sharing portrait photos of your recipe.

These are my five best tips for taking successful recipe photos every time. I blog by them, and I see the results daily. What tips do you have for taking foodie photos? Are you the King/Queen of Instagram and Pinterest? Let me know in the comments below or on my Facebook page

! If you want more formal instruction and have a CANON camera, I highly recommend the book Plate to Pixel: Digital Food Photography & Styling. It made all the difference for me and it goes into just the right amount of detail and technicality, so you can really up your photo game but won’t be too overwhelmed by technical terms!

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Happy baking and photographing,

Lauren x

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5 Tips for Food Photography Success
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17 thoughts on “5 Tips for Food Photography Success

  • February 5, 2016 at 3:39 pm
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    You’ve given me some things to think about! Thanks!

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  • February 5, 2016 at 3:56 pm
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    Great tips! The lighting definitely makes all the difference. 🙂 Since our house is quite dark – necessary in hot Aussie weather – I take most of mine out on our veranda. 🙂

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    • February 5, 2016 at 3:59 pm
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      That’s a great idea! In England outdoor photography is hit or miss, if it’s not raining it’s great to experiment with and the light is wonderful! 🙂

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  • February 5, 2016 at 9:44 pm
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    AWESOME tips, I love the up close and personal foodie shots, but need to work on those pictures that capture what’s happening around the plate, props etc. Like Krista, much of my house is dark, so will take my food outdoors and make good of the natural light.

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    • February 5, 2016 at 9:49 pm
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      Sometimes dark back drops can be dramatic so long as you’ve got some focus light highlighting the recipe you’re shooting, so by all means experiment with what you have at home too! 🙂 thanks for commenting Anna 🙂

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  • February 5, 2016 at 11:59 pm
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    this is a great post, and fantastic tips…thank you for sharing with us. I need all the help I can get as I’m still sorta new at it. I’ve just recently started posting some recipes as I love baking as much as I love travel. I find taking pictures of food SO hard, but I’m getting a wee bit better as I learn new tips like these, at least. I LOVE all your photos, so beautiful and vibrant. I need to start using more colourful props (plates, linens etc) as I usually just use a clear plate…so my baked goodies looks slightly boring. I’ve been thinking of going to my second-hand store and picking up some nice colourful antique plates.

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    • February 6, 2016 at 8:29 am
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      Second hand shops and car boot sales are a fab place to look for dishes and plates of all colours and sizes – I hope you find some that you like! 🙂 it took me a while to feel I’d got the hang of it too, but the book I mentioned From Plate to Pixel was very helpful if you want to take it further 🙂

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      • February 16, 2016 at 7:16 pm
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        ooh car boot sales, great idea! I found a couple nice ones at the flea market. I’ll take a look at that book, sounds great esp for a beginner. Thanks again 😀 I know I probably mentioned this before, but love your blog. It’s terrific!! 😀

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        • February 16, 2016 at 7:39 pm
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          It really is a very valuable and insightful read, just the right amount of technical to achieve results but be perfect for a beginner! Thank you so much, that made my day!! 😀

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  • February 6, 2016 at 7:07 am
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    I struggle with feelings of insecurity about my food photography. Thank you for these tips. They are practical and look easy to implement – but I can see you have it down to a fine art form. Your photos are beautiful.

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    • February 6, 2016 at 8:31 am
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      Thank you so much that is very kind of you! My early photos weren’t anywhere near as good though, so my blog reflects my photography journey. I don’t think it’s anything to be ashamed of to see progress, so I would encourage you to be brave and go for it! 🙂

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  • February 6, 2016 at 9:55 pm
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    Thanks for the tips! Lighting is super important – it can make or break a photo. Plenty to keep in mind there.

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    • February 7, 2016 at 7:35 am
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      It really can! When I first started I didn’t take many photos in natural light/near windows and the colours just came out so yellow because my white balance was off. Hope they’re helpful! 🙂

      Reply

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